FOOD AND DRINK TIPS FOR RIDESHARE DRIVERS

Author photoBy Michele Washburn

This article is brought to you by RideShare Mechanic, get your vehicle inspected by a certified mechanic through your smartphone today!

You are likely going to spend a lot more time in your car now that you are a rideshare driver. Want to make the best of it? Then follow this guide if you’d like to learn about the best snacks to keep in your vehicle while you drive for companies such as Uber and Lyft, as recommended by pros who have successfully made their living on the road for years.

We don’t need to tell you that you’re going to get hungry and thirsty if you drive passengers around all day. What’s worth further consideration, however, is what food and drinks are best suited for your time on the road.

 


HEALTHY THIRST QUENCHERS

Stick with water as your default drink when you get thirsty. Do your best to stay away from sugary sodas that’ll not only wreck your teeth, but since you’re sitting down for most of the job, the extra calories packed in sweetened drinks can really add up. Seltzer waters are a great way to wean yourself from cola since they come lightly flavored, have zero sugar and still have the tantalizing effervescent carbonation that makes them so satisfying to sip. Plus, they’ll keep you hydrated just like still water. Keep a small cooler in the front seat with a few so you don’t have to make extra stops for drinks when you could be earning, this will save you time, effort and money.

If you like coffee, tea or any other caffeinated drinks, try to moderate how much you drink. Any spike in energy will result in a crash, so don’t overdo it on the “go juice” while you drive. Also, don’t drink so much that you spend an inordinate amount of time looking for a restroom, since that’ll cut into your profitability during the shift.

 

SHARING IS CARING

Want to earn bonus points with your passengers? Provide individually wrapped snacks and water bottles. Nothing is better than a free drink, and customers have plenty of ways to show their appreciation. You can buy a lot of water bottles for a dollar or two at the grocery store and there’s a great chance you’ll see a good return on that small investment if you keep the water cool and readily available to your riders. Dehydration is prevalent in our society, so you could really help someone out with this simple gesture.

 

WHEN AND WHERE TO EAT

Don’t eat with a passenger in the car. It’s unprofessional, potentially dangerous, it’s rude and you stand a good chance of grossing someone out, which could lead to a less than favorable review. Think of each interaction with a passenger as a micro job interview, where you should feel encouraged to represent your very best self every mile you drive. You wouldn’t chomp down french fries while talking with a prospective employer, would you? In this industry you are your own boss, but your clients are the difference between profitability and wasted time. If you build a reputation that does not reflect well on you, clients will not come calling. You know who will keep calling, even if you don’t earn enough money? Bill collectors.

When it comes to food, make sure you don’t eat anything too noxious that will make your whole car smell like lunch. Passengers prefer a neutral smelling ride and you could see a dip in your positive rider feedback if anyone who enters your car can immediately identify what you ate an hour ago. If you’ve just got to have that seafood curry, find a nice picnic table to eat your tasty meal. It’s always a bit depressing to eat in a parked car, isn’t it? Just because you work in your car doesn’t mean you have to eat in it.

 

SNACKS VERSUS MEALS

Do you only drive a few hours at a time or less? Just eat before you leave home and you should have no problems. If you’re on the road for a majority of your day, it’s nice to have a little snack along for the ride, something to keep you comfortable and healthy, but snacks are not a suitable replacement for balanced meals, so only eat your snacks sparingly.

Now, a big decision any driver could make is whether or not they should bring their own food with them if they’ll be on the road around mealtime. If you pack anything that requires refrigeration, give additional consideration to a small cooler you can keep up front with you. Make sure it’s small enough to move into the trunk if need be. Bringing your own food from home is more economical than takeout or drive thru and, if you plan right, much healthier to boot. Some favorite healthy snacks include unsalted nuts, granola, low sodium jerky, unsweetened dark chocolate and dehydrated fruits like blueberries and bananas. All of these items are shelf stable, which means you can always keep a quick bite stowed in the glove compartment.

Check out RideShare Mechanic if you’d like to save time, money and energy on your next vehicle inspection. With RideShare Mechanic you can make sure your vehicle is up to specs from the comfort of your home with nothing more than a smartphone.  Try it online today!